Noncompliance and Defiance

This class explores the spectrum of behaviors associated with cooperation and noncompliance, including: fearful compliance, cooperation, noncompliance, defiance

Instructors Expert – Dr. Rick Delaney, author, lecturer, and practicing psychologist
Course Duration 2 credit hours
Course Delivery Self-Directed, Online
Course Provider Foster Parent College
Course Type Self-Directed, Online

A family does best when there is a good deal of cooperation from all its members. However, cooperation isn't the same as blindly going along with every request. Parents have the challenging job of helping a child balance his or her own needs and safety with the need to be a cooperative member of the family. This course examines the spectrum of cooperation and noncompliance, from fearful cooperation to defiance, including the zone in the middle of the spectrum called self-assertion.

At the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • understand the differences between cooperation and noncompliance
  • list four cooperation and noncompliance myths
  • list four common reasons for cooperation problems
  • identify where a child's response to a request falls on the spectrum of cooperation and noncompliance
  • list general steps for helping children build their ability self-assert

Course Details

Course Type: Self-Directed, Online
Duration: 2 credit hours
P.R.I.D.E. Levels of Pay:
Recertification Required: No
Provided by: Foster Parent College
Training Type: Professional Development

Resource Files

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